University of Worcester Shortlisted for National Sustainability Awards

The University of Worcester has been shortlisted for three national sustainability awards, including Sustainability Institution of the Year.

The Green Gown Awards recognise exceptional sustainability initiatives by universities and colleges and best practice within the further and higher education sector.

As well as Sustainability Institution of the Year, the University of Worcester is shortlisted in the Benefiting Society and Sustainability Reporting categories.

Katy Boom, Director of Sustainability at the University of Worcester, said: “We are thrilled that the University’s longstanding efforts towards sustainability, but also its efforts to bring awareness to the wider community, have been recognised in this way.  As a university we are committed to making a difference to society and we will continue to strive in this positive direction.  Our students play a massive part in enacting these green thinking initiatives, which we hope enhances their skills and experience for future careers, but also sees them leave university with a sustainability awareness that they will take with them through their lives and careers.”

The Sustainability Institute of the Year recognises how the University strives for greater sustainability in its buildings and operations; its learning, teaching and research; partnerships and engagement with the community. 

The Green Gown Award for Benefiting Society focuses on the University of Worcester’s collaborative work with the Worcester Polytechnic Institute in America.

Students from both institutes worked together on schemes such as Energize Worcester, an ongoing collaboration between the University, Worcester Bosch Group, Worcester City Council and Worcester Students’ Union that works with landlords and students to improve energy efficiency in student homes.  The scheme sees manufacturer Bosch install free Smart Boilers and data loggers into a number of student houses.  Students from the UK collaborated with American counterparts to complete and analyse 180 in-depth interviews with students and landlords.  These have given a better understanding of conflicts between students’ real and perceived behaviour, which could help focus more effective information campaigns, and given Bosch new insights. 

Worcester students also collaborated with their US counterparts on the Go Green Week in the City in April, an annual week of activities designed to open up dialogue about sustainability, raise awareness and inspire new actions and behaviour around areas like transport and food.

The University of Worcester was recently ranked the fourth most sustainable university in the country by campaigning organisation People and Planet’s University League, which measures environmental performance at higher education institutions.

This was the fourth consecutive year that the University had been ranked in the top five.

Naomi Goldman, 22, a second year Geography student who has worked on sustainability projects at the University, said: “The University of Worcester has a very positive attitude toward sustainability, and strives to encourage students to live more sustainably, as well as providing easily accessible knowledge about sustainability to students and staff.

“Working on sustainability projects at Worcester has made me realise the urgency of spreading knowledge about sustainability, and changing unsustainable habits.  It has absolutely improved my knowledge on the subject, and has deepened my interest and determination to create a more sustainable world for generations to come. I also hope to have a career that involves sustainability.”

This year’s winners will be announced at an awards ceremony on November 8.

There are a limited number of places available to start in September 2018 for well-qualified applicants.

For more information visit www.worcester.ac.uk or call 01905 855111.

Sarah Dawes